There are many methods for brewing a fine cup of coffee...

The Definitive Guide How To Brew Coffee
   There are many methods for brewing a fine cup of coffee - no single technique is right for everyone. The method you choose for brewing your coffee should be based on your needs and your unique coffee preferences. Do you want a hearty mug of coffee for breakfast?  An afternoon cappucino? Or a dessert espresso? Do you prefer a milder coffee or a more robust coffee flavor?

   The quality and flavor of your coffee is not only determined by the brewing process you prefer but also by the type of coffee you select.  For example, what country is the coffee from, what region and what variety of coffee tree?  Or is it a blend from several countries, regions or varieties?  Do you favor a dark roast coffee, a light blend or something in between?  What kind of grind have you selected?  Remember to be creative - you can choose a dark espresso roast coffee and still have it ground to be brewed in a drip system.

   But no matter how you choose to brew your coffee, there are guidelines to follow which will give you the best cup of coffee possible.  To optimize the quality of every cup of coffee you prepare, fine-tune your brewing routine by incorporating these suggestions.

How to Brew Coffee

The Equipment
   Make sure that your equipment is thoroughly cleaned after each use by rinsing it with clear, hot water and drying it with an absorbant towel. Check that no grounds have been left to collect on any part of the equipment and that there is no build-up of coffee oil. Such residue can impart a bitter, rancid flavor to future cups of coffee.

The Coffee
   Purchase coffee as soon after it has been roasted as possible. Fresh roasted coffee is essential to a superb cup of coffee. And purchase your coffee in small amounts—only as much as you can use in a given period of time. Ideally you should purchase your coffee fresh every 1-2 weeks.

The Grind 
   If you purchase whole bean coffee, always grind your beans as close to the brew time as possible. A burr or mill grinder is preferable because all of the coffee is ground to a consistent size.  A blade grinder is less preferable because some coffee will be ground more finely than the rest. If you normally grind your coffee at home with a blade grinder, try having it ground at the store with a burr grinder. You may be surprised at the difference!

   Do not underestimate the importance of the size of the grind to the taste of your coffee. If your coffee tastes bitter, it may be overextracted, or ground too fine.  On the other hand, if your coffee tastes flat, it may be underextracted, meaning that your grind is too coarse. Tell the professionals where you purchase your coffee exactly how you will be brewing it. For example, will you be using a plunger pot?  A flat drip filter? A cone drip filter?  A gold mesh filter? They will grind it specifically for the preparation method you have chosen and the equipment you use.

   Before using the coffee, try rubbing some of the grounds between your fingers so that you can 'feel' the grind and become acquainted with the differences in size.

   Never reuse your coffee grounds. Once brewed, the desirable coffee flavors have been extracted and only the bitter undesirable ones are left.

The Water
   The water you use is VERY important to the quality of your coffee. Use filtered or bottled water if your tap water is not good or imparts a strong odor or taste, such as chlorine. If you are using tap water let it run a few seconds before filling your coffee pot. Be sure to use cold water. Do not use distilled or softened water.

Ratio of Coffee to Water
   Use the proper amount of coffee for every six ounces of water that is actually brewed, remembering that some water is lost to evaporation in certain brewing methods. A general guideline is 1 to 2 tablespoons of ground coffee for every six ounces of water. This can be adjusted to suit individual taste preferences.  Be sure to check the 'cup' lines on your brewer to see how they actually measure.

Water Temperature During Brewing
   Your brewer should maintain a water temperature between 195 - 205 degrees Fahrenheit for optimal extraction.  Colder water will result in flat, underextracted coffee while water that is too hot will also cause a loss of quality in the taste of the coffee.  If you are brewing the coffee manually, let the water come to a full boil, but do not overboil. Turn off the heat source and allow the water to rest a minute before pouring it over the grounds.

Brewing Time
   The amount of time that the water is in contact with the coffee grounds is another important factor affecting the taste of your coffee. In a drip system, the contact time should be approximately 5 minutes. If you are making your coffee using a plunger pot, the contact time should be 2-4 minutes. Espresso, as the name implies, means that the brew time is short—the coffee is in contact with the water for only 20-30 seconds. If the taste of your coffee is not optimal, it is possible that you are either overextracting (the brew time is too long) or underextracting (the brew time is too short) your coffee. Experiment with the contact time until you can make a cup of coffee that suits your tastes perfectly.

After Your Coffee Has Been Brewed

Brewed coffee should be enjoyed immediately!
   Pour it into a warmed mug or coffee cup so that it will maintain its temperature as long as possible. Brewed coffee begins to lose its optimal taste moments after brewing so only brew as much coffee as will be consumed immediately. If it will be a few minutes before it will be served, the temperature should be maintained at 180 - 185 degrees Fahrenheit.  It should never be left on an electric burner for longer than 15 minutes because it will begin to develop a burned taste. If the coffee is not to be served immediately after brewing, it should be poured into a warmed, insulated thermos and used within the next 45 minutes.

Never reheat your coffee.

Enjoy Your Coffee!
   A finely prepared cup of coffee should be enjoyed as thoughtfully as it was brewed.  Take a moment to smell the aroma. Take a sip and notice your coffee's flavor. How does it compare to other coffees with regard to body, acidity and balance?  If it is a coffee that is new to you, notice how it is different.  If it is what you normally drink, note its degree of freshness or how simple changes in preparation affect the cup's flavor.

   A steeping cup of coffee will not last long, but every sip is meant to be savored and enjoyed!

How to Make Coffee

1. Gather your ingredients. You will need a coffee maker with a clean carafe and filter, a grinder, and a cup.

2. Grind the beans. Set your grinder to medium (or whatever the machine maker recommends). You can also use pre-ground coffee, at the expense of a little flavor. Selection of beans is key. If you want something light and pleasant, try a flavored coffee or a mild blend. If you want a hard, energizing "wake-up" brew, you might want espresso or Kona beans. Mixing beans often gets you some great combination.

3. Place the filter into the brewing basket. Following the instructions for your particular coffee maker, use the right size filter and place in the basket. If it's removable, you can rinse the filter and basket in hot water to remove any paper flavor.
   There are also reusable gold filters available for many coffee makers. These cut down on paper waste, add no flavor at all to the brew, and are easily cleaned.

4. Add the grounds. Most coffee makers like to have about 2 tablespoons per cup. Adjust this proportion to taste: stronger coffee means more grounds, lighter coffee means less. If you brew it too strong, you can always add some hot water to your cup.

5. Fill the reservoir. Use the carafe as a measuring cup by filling it with the appropriate amount of water for the amount of coffee you have used. (Most coffee pots have measurements on the side.)

6. Turn it on. Press the On or Power button/switch. After a minute or two as the machine pre-heats the water, your coffee should begin brewing. Some machines brew quickly, but others brew slowly. Slow isn't actually all bad though; it gives the end result a more rounded flavor. Play some music or entertain yourself for a few minutes while your coffee is brewing. The coffee is done when you stop hearing bubbling sounds.

7. Drink up! Pour yourself a cup and add cream and/or sugar if desired.

Does Green Coffee Bean Extract Really Help With Weight Loss or Is It Just Hype ?

   According to a study of green coffee bean extract published in the Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity Journal*, over a period of just 12 weeks test subjects lost an average of 10.5% of their overall body weight and 16% of their overall body fat - all without changing their eating or exercise habits. Each and every test subject lost an average of 17 pounds over the 12 week period. And all with no side affects.

   Again, the success is attributed to the natural chlorogenic acid found in the green coffee beans. Because chlorogenic acid prevents the release of glucose into the blood stream the liver the metabolism increases which causes the liver to burn more fat, faster. These two processes also work together to prevent the body from absorbing and storing fat.

   Naturally, you can speed up pounds lost even more with a sensible eating program and a regular exercise routine. But what's so surprising about this research is that these individuals were able to lose the weight with no change to their eating habits, no strenuous exercise regimen and no side effects. That's a tremendous improvement over recent diet aids that have caused everything from unpredictable anal leakage to heart defects.

Health Benefits of Green Coffee Bean Extract

   Chlorogenic acid, the key component of green coffee bean extract, is a powerful natural anitoxidant which combats free radicals in the blood stream. The affect is to slow down the aging process, and improve circulation and muscle tone.

   The major anti-oxidant in green coffee bean extract, chlorogenic acid, inhibits the release of the G6P enzyme which has been shown to significantly stabilizes blood sugar levels, so diabetics can definitely benefit from taking this supplement. Diabetics can also benefit greatly from any reduction in weight that may occur from taking green coffee bean extract, as well.

   That is only one of the reasons that this research is so exciting. According to studies published in the Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity Journal, green coffee bean extract may just be the first weight reduction product ever that actually delivers on its promises.